2015 Ford Transit Van For Sale

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I regret needing to depart so soon with my Ford Transit Van, but life changes require that I begin the process of finding it a new home. The van has been garage-kept since we purchased it. The desire to keep it inside is reason we chose a low roof model. We have had absolutely no issues with the van; it runs great and has been serviced per Ford’s recommendations. Please comment or email andrewbcork@gmail.com if you have any questions.

The Van:
2015 Ford Transit 150
Model: Low Roof, Regular length (10′ cargo area)
Engine: 3.7L V6
Miles: 12,088
Color: Oxford White
Price: $24,500
Location: Waco, TX

Features:

  • 60/40 split side entry
  • Rear windows
  • Cruise Control
  • Rear backup camera with display in rear view mirror. (best feature you can add to a cargo van!)
  • Tinted windows
  • Low roof fits inside a standard garage
  • 4 keys

Conversion Highlights:

  • Insulated using Reflectix inner layer with denim insulation in walls and under floor. 3/4″ styrofoam in the ceiling.
  • Wall and ceiling panels wrapped with Duramax tweed fabric for extra sound dampening and nice aesthetic appearance.
  • One-piece rubber mat covers floor
  • Modular sofa/bed – sleeps two
  • Bug screens for driver/passenger windows and drop-down net for rear doors.
  • Multi-color LED lights mounted in ceiling run off Goal Zero Yeti battery (included)
  • Mounts for one 15mm thru-axle mountain or cyclorcorss bike and one 9mm road bike.
  • Overhead storage compartment.
  • Storage compartment covering wheel well.
  • Custom window shades for privacy, insulation, and to seal out light while sleeping.

Van Photos:

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Conversion Details:

 

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I snapped this photo of the van right after bringing it home.

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This picture details the reflectix covering the ceiling and upper wall panels.

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The two driver side lower panels have inset pockets for additional storage. I tried to utilize every inch of space I could find.

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A shot of the back driver side panel shows the rear storage compartment. You can also see the first 3/4″ insulation sheet going into place in the ceiling.

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Behind the upper panels is a frame consisting of 2×2’s and 2×4’s. This served two purposes; to help hold in the insulation and to provide extra areas to screw the walls into. I built this van to last. One of my pet peeves is a vehicle that rattles. I knew that not all roads we would travel on would be smooth and would require some heavy-duty measures to keep it from rattling and falling apart over time. After 12,000 miles, and having driven (slowly) down a handful of Jeep roads in Colorado, I have not had to tighten, fix or replace a single thing.

You will also notice the insulation is hidden behind a vapor barrier (plastic sheet).

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Details one of the four LED light bars. This one is mounted over the passenger side cargo access door.

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The electrical wires for the rear cargo lights and the tail lights are bound in that black tube running along the upper corner of the cargo area. Not wanting to touch any of the electrical system, I built around them. This shows the box I built to enclose them. This box also serves as a mount for the other three LED bars as you can see hanging in this picture.

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This is a box covering the passenger side rear wheel well. The top of the box is on hinges so you can open it and store things inside.

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I built an attachment to the cargo box with two bike mounts attached. When the bike mount is not needed, you can either swivel it in an upright position so you can walk through or quickly remove it by twisting the screw. When unattached, there is a place to secure it inside the wheel well cover.

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The finished product after being covered with the same fabric used on the walls.

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With only around 60 square feet of space to work with, everything had to be dual-purpose. This especially applied to the bed; the largest piece of furniture in the van. The bed is essentially a sofa box with a slat design that allows for it to expand outward. In this picture, you can see the bed in the “sofa” position. I had a 220 pound person lie on the extended part of the bed. He felt no flex and the bed showed no sign of stress.

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This is the bed with one half of the slots extended about half way to demonstrate how it works.

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Under the bed is plenty of storage. Here you can see pillows, blankets, sleeping bags, Goal Zero battery and water jugs all tucked neatly out of the way.img_5399The door at the end of the bed opens so you can easily access the storage when standing outside of the van.

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I took left over Reflectix and cut one window cover for each window. This was primarily so we could sleep knowing no one could look in at us while sleeping but it turns out it is a must-have when trying to sleep after the sun starts to rise.